Montreal's Vital Signs 2010
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Here we are at the dawn of a very special year in terms of demographics. In fact, the first wave of the populous baby boomer generation, born between 1946 and 1965, will reach 65 years of age in 2011. This suggests the likelihood of numerous adjustments on many levels.
The census metropolitan area (CMA) commonly referred to in this report as “Greater Montreal” or simply “the region,” includes the islands of Montreal and Laval, the agglomeration of Longueuil and the neighbouring North and South Shore communities. For convenience, we also use the expression “the island” when we refer to the agglomeration, the health region, the economic region or the administrative region of Montreal.


The Census Metropolitan Area of Montreal
Municipalities belonging to the CMA of Montreal, compiled by the MCM (Montreal Citizen’s Movement)
http://www.mamrot.gouv.qc.ca/publications/cartotheque/RMR_Mun.pdf
Source : Ministère des Affaires Municipales, des Régions et de l’Occupation du territoire
  • In 2009, there were 3,814,738 inhabitants in the Greater Montreal region, close to half (48.7%) of the population of Quebec. With 1,906,811 residents, the island itself accounted for close to one quarter of Quebec’s population. It is worth noting that the population was equally divided between the island and its shores; the latter housed an additional 1,116 inhabitants. 1
  • In 2007, the region successfully retained 24% of the total number of immigrants (intra-provincial, interprovincial and international) in its territory. Toronto (42%) and Vancouver (44%) had much higher statistics in this respect. 2
  • In 2007, the region managed to retain 86% of international immigrants in its territory. Toronto (89%) and Vancouver (88%) showed slightly higher results. 2
  • Between 1999 and 2009, in Greater Montreal, the average number of children per reproductive-aged woman increased from 1.46 to 1.65, lower than the generational replacement rate of 2.1 children per woman. 3
  • In 2009, the 15 and under age group represented 16.2% of the population of the region, a decrease of 2.1 percentage points over the last ten years. Over the same time period, the 65-and-over age group gained 1.4 percentage points to reach 13.9%. 4
  • In 2009, among the elderly of Greater Montreal, 58% were women, and more than 22,000 residents were 90 years of age or older, of which 77% were women. This balance could taper off in light of a marked improvement in the life expectancy of men over the last 20 years. 4
  • In 2006, the proportion of households with a main income earner 65 years or older was similar in Laval (22.3%) and in Montreal (21.9%), while it was less in Longueuil (20.2%), similar to Greater Montreal (20.1%). In fifteen years (2026), forecasters predict that these households will maintain the same percentage on the island (29.2%) and in Greater Montreal (30.3%), but that Longueuil (34.8%) will equal and even surpass Laval (33.7%) in this respect. 5
  • In 2009, of the three urban areas, Laval had the highest percentage of young people (17.3%), Montreal had more seniors (15.8%), and in Longueuil, the two groups are neck-in-neck, up to 15.1%. 6
  • While Laval and Longueuil will each have 23% of senior citizens in 2026, it is forecast that Montreal will surpass the urban centre status of “old enough” compared to the average Quebecer, to that of “relatively young”, since one person in five (20.7%) will be a senior, compared to one in four (24.4%) in Quebec. This situation will be partly attributed to the fact that the island population is expected to experience a growth of 15% by 2026. 7
  • In 2006, adults [25 to 44 years of age] of parents born in Canada were less numerous in the centre of the metropolitan area than in the periphery. This is particularly true in Montreal, where this age group comprises less than half of the central municipal population (45%), but three-quarters (74%) of that of surrounding municipalities. In Toronto (21% vs. 24%) and Vancouver (29% vs. 34%), the gap is much less notable. 8
  • Between 2001 and 2006, among 25 to 44 year olds, a greater proportion of francophones (17%) than anglophones (11%) and allophones (11%) left the city of Montreal and relocated in neighbouring municipalities. And among all of these, francophones chose to stay on the island less often (3%) than anglophones (26%) and allophones (11%). 8
  • In fifteen years, in 2026, with regard to the language spoken at home, it is expected that 18.8% of the population of Greater Montreal will be allophone (an increase of 4.8 percentage points since 2006), 15% anglophone (-1.7%) and 66.2% francophone (-3.2%). 9
The Every Senior’s Choir
© Montreal City Mission

dotThe Every Senior’s Choir addresses the isolation problem faced by seniors by providing a social activity for musical expression. In addition to developing cultural, linguistic and ireligious diversity, the Every Senior’s Choir is also an intergenerational collaborative experience involving youth: the Every Kid Choir! By uniting two generations with the universal language of music, Montreal City Mission hopes to build a bridge that will create dialogue, as well as improved mutual understanding between generations and cultures.

www.montrealcitymission.org/en/
Sources :

1 Estimations de la population des régions métropolitaines de recensement (RMR), 1er juillet des années 1996, 2001 et 2006 à 2009 (découpage géographique au 1er janvier 2006), Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/dons_regnl/regional/rmr_total.htm
  Estimation de la population des régions administratives, 1er juillet des années 1996, 2001 et 2006 à 2009 (découpage géographique au 1er juillet 2009), Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/dons_regnl/regional/ra_total.htm

2 Annual migration estimates by census division/Census metropolitan area according to 2006 census data, Table 111-0029, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VI-1-b.pdf

3 Taux de fécondité selon le groupe d'âge de la mère, indice synthétique de fécondité et âge moyen à la maternité, par région métropolitaine de recensement, Québec (6 avril 2010), Banque de données des statistiques officielles sur le Québec
http://www.bdso.gouv.qc.ca/pls/ken/iwae.proc_acce?p_temp_bran=ISQ

4 Estimation de la population des RMR par groupe d'âge et sexe, 1er juillet des années 1996 à 2009 (découpage géographique au 1er juillet 2009), Tableaux Excel, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/dons_regnl/regional/index.htm

5 Ménages privés selon le groupe d'âge du principal soutien, scénario A de référence, municipalités régionales de comté et territoires équivalents (MRC), Québec, 2001-2026. Perspectives démographiques, Québec et régions, 2001-2051, édition 2003, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/persp_poplt/mrc2001_2026/index.htm
  Ménages privés selon le groupe d'âge du principal soutien, scénario A de référence, Québec et régions métropolitaines, 2001-2026. Perspectives démographiques, Québec et régions, 2001-2051, édition 2003, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/persp_poplt/menages/index.htm

6 Estimation de la population des MRC et des territoires équivalents par groupe d'âge et sexe, 1er juillet des années 1996 à 2009 (découpage géographique au 1er juillet 2009), Tableaux Excel, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/dons_regnl/regional/index.htm

7 Les perspectives démographiques par municipalité régionale de comté et territoire équivalent (MRC), 2001-2026, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/persp_poplt/mrc2001_2026/index.htm
  Portrait statistique régional des aînés du Québec, par Thomas Druetz, Association québécoise des retraité(e) s des secteurs public et parapublic, 2007
http://www.aqrp.qc.ca/portrait.pdf

8 Migration from central to surrounding municipalities in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver, by Martin Turcotte and Mireille Vézina, Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2010002/c-g/11159/map-carte002-eng.htm

9 Nouvelles perspectives démolinguistiques du Québec et de la région de Montréal, 2001-2051, Suivi de la situation linguistique, Étude 8, par Marc Termote avec la collaboration de Normand Thibault, Office québécois de la langue française, Montréal, 2008, 146 p.
http://www.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/etudes/etude_08.pdf