Montreal's Vital Signs 2010
entete
Here we are at the dawn of a very special year in terms of demographics. In fact, the first wave of the populous baby boomer generation, born between 1946 and 1965, will reach 65 years of age in 2011. This suggests the likelihood of numerous adjustments on many levels.
The census metropolitan area (CMA) commonly referred to in this report as “Greater Montreal” or simply “the region,” includes the islands of Montreal and Laval, the agglomeration of Longueuil and the neighbouring North and South Shore communities. For convenience, we also use the expression “the island” when we refer to the agglomeration, the health region, the economic region or the administrative region of Montreal.


The Census Metropolitan Area of Montreal
Municipalities belonging to the CMA of Montreal, compiled by the MCM (Montreal Citizen’s Movement)
http://www.mamrot.gouv.qc.ca/publications/cartotheque/RMR_Mun.pdf
Source : Ministère des Affaires Municipales, des Régions et de l’Occupation du territoire
  • In 2009, there were 3,814,738 inhabitants in the Greater Montreal region, close to half (48.7%) of the population of Quebec. With 1,906,811 residents, the island itself accounted for close to one quarter of Quebec’s population. It is worth noting that the population was equally divided between the island and its shores; the latter housed an additional 1,116 inhabitants. 1
  • In 2007, the region successfully retained 24% of the total number of immigrants (intra-provincial, interprovincial and international) in its territory. Toronto (42%) and Vancouver (44%) had much higher statistics in this respect. 2
  • In 2007, the region managed to retain 86% of international immigrants in its territory. Toronto (89%) and Vancouver (88%) showed slightly higher results. 2
  • Between 1999 and 2009, in Greater Montreal, the average number of children per reproductive-aged woman increased from 1.46 to 1.65, lower than the generational replacement rate of 2.1 children per woman. 3
  • In 2009, the 15 and under age group represented 16.2% of the population of the region, a decrease of 2.1 percentage points over the last ten years. Over the same time period, the 65-and-over age group gained 1.4 percentage points to reach 13.9%. 4
  • In 2009, among the elderly of Greater Montreal, 58% were women, and more than 22,000 residents were 90 years of age or older, of which 77% were women. This balance could taper off in light of a marked improvement in the life expectancy of men over the last 20 years. 4
  • In 2006, the proportion of households with a main income earner 65 years or older was similar in Laval (22.3%) and in Montreal (21.9%), while it was less in Longueuil (20.2%), similar to Greater Montreal (20.1%). In fifteen years (2026), forecasters predict that these households will maintain the same percentage on the island (29.2%) and in Greater Montreal (30.3%), but that Longueuil (34.8%) will equal and even surpass Laval (33.7%) in this respect. 5
  • In 2009, of the three urban areas, Laval had the highest percentage of young people (17.3%), Montreal had more seniors (15.8%), and in Longueuil, the two groups are neck-in-neck, up to 15.1%. 6
  • While Laval and Longueuil will each have 23% of senior citizens in 2026, it is forecast that Montreal will surpass the urban centre status of “old enough” compared to the average Quebecer, to that of “relatively young”, since one person in five (20.7%) will be a senior, compared to one in four (24.4%) in Quebec. This situation will be partly attributed to the fact that the island population is expected to experience a growth of 15% by 2026. 7
  • In 2006, adults [25 to 44 years of age] of parents born in Canada were less numerous in the centre of the metropolitan area than in the periphery. This is particularly true in Montreal, where this age group comprises less than half of the central municipal population (45%), but three-quarters (74%) of that of surrounding municipalities. In Toronto (21% vs. 24%) and Vancouver (29% vs. 34%), the gap is much less notable. 8
  • Between 2001 and 2006, among 25 to 44 year olds, a greater proportion of francophones (17%) than anglophones (11%) and allophones (11%) left the city of Montreal and relocated in neighbouring municipalities. And among all of these, francophones chose to stay on the island less often (3%) than anglophones (26%) and allophones (11%). 8
  • In fifteen years, in 2026, with regard to the language spoken at home, it is expected that 18.8% of the population of Greater Montreal will be allophone (an increase of 4.8 percentage points since 2006), 15% anglophone (-1.7%) and 66.2% francophone (-3.2%). 9
The Every Senior’s Choir
© Montreal City Mission

dotThe Every Senior’s Choir addresses the isolation problem faced by seniors by providing a social activity for musical expression. In addition to developing cultural, linguistic and ireligious diversity, the Every Senior’s Choir is also an intergenerational collaborative experience involving youth: the Every Kid Choir! By uniting two generations with the universal language of music, Montreal City Mission hopes to build a bridge that will create dialogue, as well as improved mutual understanding between generations and cultures.

www.montrealcitymission.org/en/
Sources :

1 Estimations de la population des régions métropolitaines de recensement (RMR), 1er juillet des années 1996, 2001 et 2006 à 2009 (découpage géographique au 1er janvier 2006), Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/dons_regnl/regional/rmr_total.htm
  Estimation de la population des régions administratives, 1er juillet des années 1996, 2001 et 2006 à 2009 (découpage géographique au 1er juillet 2009), Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/dons_regnl/regional/ra_total.htm

2 Annual migration estimates by census division/Census metropolitan area according to 2006 census data, Table 111-0029, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VI-1-b.pdf

3 Taux de fécondité selon le groupe d'âge de la mère, indice synthétique de fécondité et âge moyen à la maternité, par région métropolitaine de recensement, Québec (6 avril 2010), Banque de données des statistiques officielles sur le Québec
http://www.bdso.gouv.qc.ca/pls/ken/iwae.proc_acce?p_temp_bran=ISQ

4 Estimation de la population des RMR par groupe d'âge et sexe, 1er juillet des années 1996 à 2009 (découpage géographique au 1er juillet 2009), Tableaux Excel, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/dons_regnl/regional/index.htm

5 Ménages privés selon le groupe d'âge du principal soutien, scénario A de référence, municipalités régionales de comté et territoires équivalents (MRC), Québec, 2001-2026. Perspectives démographiques, Québec et régions, 2001-2051, édition 2003, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/persp_poplt/mrc2001_2026/index.htm
  Ménages privés selon le groupe d'âge du principal soutien, scénario A de référence, Québec et régions métropolitaines, 2001-2026. Perspectives démographiques, Québec et régions, 2001-2051, édition 2003, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/persp_poplt/menages/index.htm

6 Estimation de la population des MRC et des territoires équivalents par groupe d'âge et sexe, 1er juillet des années 1996 à 2009 (découpage géographique au 1er juillet 2009), Tableaux Excel, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/dons_regnl/regional/index.htm

7 Les perspectives démographiques par municipalité régionale de comté et territoire équivalent (MRC), 2001-2026, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/persp_poplt/mrc2001_2026/index.htm
  Portrait statistique régional des aînés du Québec, par Thomas Druetz, Association québécoise des retraité(e) s des secteurs public et parapublic, 2007
http://www.aqrp.qc.ca/portrait.pdf

8 Migration from central to surrounding municipalities in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver, by Martin Turcotte and Mireille Vézina, Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2010002/c-g/11159/map-carte002-eng.htm

9 Nouvelles perspectives démolinguistiques du Québec et de la région de Montréal, 2001-2051, Suivi de la situation linguistique, Étude 8, par Marc Termote avec la collaboration de Normand Thibault, Office québécois de la langue française, Montréal, 2008, 146 p.
http://www.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/etudes/etude_08.pdf


Having proved its strong dynamism in terms of research and innovation, and endowed with the necessary assets to confirm its worth, Montreal is in a position to develop even further.
  • pictogramme économieThe best land in Quebec is in Greater Montreal, where 54% of the territory is agricultural. Even in Laval, where this activity is essentially located in the suburban area, and occupies approximately 28% of the land. Of course developers heavily covet these lands. 1
  • In 2005, more than two thirds of Quebec food-processing activities were carried out within Greater Montreal, where they alone accounted for 9% of employment, with close to one third of Quebec workers in the sector. 2
  • In 2004, vegetable production was the principal source of agricultural revenue (71%) in Greater Montreal, while animal production accounted for close to 30%. 2
  • Among the 30 most important economic regions in Canada, Montreal was ranked second for the size of its population in 2009, but 20th in terms of income per resident. 3
  • Between 2000 and 2008, the median family income in the region increased (+14.8%) more than the average income (+11.9%). In 2008, the median income (after tax) was $58,900, 7.8% less than the Canadian average and 5.4% more than the Quebec average. In addition, this average income (after tax) reached $68,700, or 7.9% below the Canadian average and 7.2% above the Quebec average. 4
  • In 2009, the real gross domestic product (GDP) of Greater Montreal increased to $73,071 per worker [in 2002 dollars], a level 5.6% greater than that in Quebec ($69,225) but 3.8% less than that of Canada ($75,937). 5
  • With 9.4% of its employees in the high tech sector in 2007, Greater Montreal was ranked 5th in North America. Toronto was ranked 8th (8.3%). 3
  • Between 2003 and 2007, Montreal went from 27th to 19th rank among the most dynamic technological centres in North America. During the same time period, Toronto’s rank climbed from 25th to 15th. 6
  • With 628 patents granted in the region, Montreal ranks second for innovation, behind Toronto (633). With regard to patented inventions, Montreal (13%) scores between Vancouver (9.8%) and Ottawa (15.2%), with Toronto winning the highest honour with double the score (26.9%). 7
  • A study revealed that 26.7% of Montreal adults were recently involved in an entrepreneurial project, a lower proportion than in Toronto (34.3%) and Vancouver (38.3%). 3
  • pictogramme homme lisantIn 2009, among 215 large international cities, Montreal ranked 22nd for its quality of life and 15th for its infrastructure [electricity, water, transportation, communications]. If we only consider the Americas, quality of life puts Montreal in 4th place, behind three Canadian cities, while its infrastructure puts it in second place, tied with Atlanta, but behind Vancouver. 8
  • Among 41 urban centres with over 2 million inhabitants, Montreal sits comfortably in 4th place in terms of business operating costs, ahead of Toronto (5th), but behind Vancouver (1st), after placing 6th in 2008. In the research and development sector, Montreal is first among North American cities and ranked second in the world behind Melbourne, Australia. 9
Sources:

1 "Dynamiques agricoles dans les territoires périurbains à Montréal : situation présente et future", par Claude Marois, Colloque La dynamique des territoires en milieu périurbain et le patrimoine naturel et culturel, Université de Montréal, 2006, 13 p.
http://www.vrm.ca/documents/periurbain_Marois_texte.pdf

2 Recueil statistique sur les activités agricoles, Service de l’aménagement et du transport métropolitain de la Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal, 2008, 18 p.
http://www.cmm.qc.ca/fileadmin/user_upload/documents/recueilstatistique_activitesagricoles_20080417.pdf

3 Une métropole à la hauteur de nos aspirations, rapport réalisé par le Groupe de travail sur les enjeux de gouvernance et de fiscalité de Montréal, Chambre de commerce du Montréal métropolitain, 2010, 94 p.
http://www.ccmm.qc.ca/documents/memoires/2009_2010/10_03_31_rapport-gouvernance-fiscalite.pdf

4 Income trends in Canada, Cansim Tables 202-0603 and 202-0605, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/XI-5-c-ii.pdf
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/XI-6-c-ii.pdf

5 Cansim Tables 384-0002 and 282-0055, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/XIII-2.pdf

6 North America’s high-tech economy: The geography of knowledge-based industries, Milken Institute
http://www.milkeninstitute.org/nahightech/nahightech.taf

7 Nombre de brevets d'invention de l'USPTO détenus selon le type de titulaire, par RMR canadienne (5 juillet 2010) et Nombre d'inventions brevetées à l'USPTO par RMR canadienne et part dans le total canadien (5 juillet 2010), Banque de données des statistiques officielles sur le Québec
http://www.bdso.gouv.qc.ca/pls/ken/iwae.proc_acce?p_temp_bran=ISQ

8 Quality of living survey highlights, Mercer, 2009
http://www.mercer.com/qualityofliving

9 Competitive alternatives, KPMG’s guide to international business location, Executive Highlights, 2010 edition, 8 p.
ftp://ftp.competitivealternatives.com/2010_compalt_execsum_en.pdf


Despite a marked increase in unemployment in the last few years, Montreal is in better shape than Toronto. And our young people have less difficulty finding work, while we expect an increase in worker retirement.

Evolution of Unemployment Rates
Montreal and Toronto CMA
source : Statistics Canada 1
*Seasonally adjusted data from July 2010 - 3 month moving average
  • In 2009, those younger than 25 experienced an unemployment rate of 17.8%, lower than that of Toronto (18.5%), but much greater than that of Vancouver (12%). This rate is 93.5% higher than that of the entire active population of Greater Montreal. 2
  • In 2009, the region had 1,880,400 workers in the employment market, 1% less than in 2008, a decline equal to that in Quebec, but less than that of Canada (-1.6%). Since 2000, annual employment growth was on average 1.4% in the region, 1.5% in Quebec, and 1.7% in Canada. 3
  • In 2009, 18.2% of workers in the region worked part time. For a quarter of these workers, it was an involuntary situation. And twice as many workers were looking for full-time employment (8%) than those who weren’t looking at all (16.4%). In total, 27,300 people working part time and actively seeking full-time employment accounted for 1.45% of the workforce. 4
  • In 2008, the average employment income reached $25,395 in Greater Montreal, an increase of 2% compared to the previous year, similar to the rest of Quebec, where it was $23,723. 5
  • deco travailIn ten years, Montreal will be the second largest Canadian city in terms of the number of retirees, after Vancouver. This population will mostly be women with more education, who have acquired relative financial autonomy. 6
Sources:

1 Working-age population information, Statistics Canada, August 2007
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/71-001-x/2010007/t014-eng.htm
  Working-age population study, Cansim Tables 282-0053 and 282-0055, Statistics Canada
http://www.vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2007/table-IX-2.pdf
  Taux de chômage, par région administrative, par région métropolitaine de recensement et ensemble du Québec, 1999-2009, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/march_travl_remnr/parnt_etudn_march_travl/pop_active/stat_reg/taux_chomage_reg.htm

2 Working-age population study, Cansim Tables 282-0053 and 282-0055, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VI-4-b-i-app.pdf

3 Working-age population study, Cansim Tables 282-0053, 282-0055 and 282-0064, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/IX-3-a-i.pdf

4 Working-age population study, Special Request, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/IX-6-iii-app.pdf
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/IX-6-vi-app.pdf
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/IX-6-viii-app.pdf

http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/IX-6-x-app.pdf
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/IX-6-xi-app.pdf

5 Revenu personnel et ses composantes par habitant, régions métropolitaines de recensement et ensemble du Québec, 2004-2008, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/econm_finnc/conjn_econm/revenu_personnel/rp08_rmr-hab.htm

6 Retraitées avant 65 ans : regards d’une nouvelle génération, par Anne Quéniart et al. Comité Femmes et développement régional de la Conférence régionale des élus de Montréal, 2005
http://bv.cdeacf.ca/CF_PDF/82869.pdf

The little money that low-income residents have is definitely a major preoccupation in their lives. They need money not only for transportation and entertainment, but first and foremost, for healthy eating and proper housing.
  • pommeBetween 2001 and 2006, the more privileged families in Greater Montreal saw their income increase by 17%, while less well-to-do families experienced a rise of 19.7%. This resulted in a reduction in the largest gap (-1.8%) among Canadian cities, ahead of Ottawa (-1%). On the other hand, in Calgary (+1.7%), Toronto (+3.3%), and especially Vancouver (+5.9%), there was a notable increase in the gap between rich and poor. 1
  • In 2008, 18% of the population of Greater Montreal lived below the low-income* threshold - the highest proportion in Canadian cities – increasing by 3 points from last year, and nearly 40% since 1985. 2
    *Relative measure of low-income families, based on 50% of their median income (after tax) according to the census, and adjusted relative to their type and size.
  • In 2008, 19.5% of children and adolescents in Greater Montreal lived in poverty. After hovering around 16% in 1985 and 1990, this rate experienced a significant increase in 1995 (24.4%), and then a decline until 2005 (11.8%), and it has clearly increased since 2007 (16.5%). 3
  • On the island, in 2009, 31% of public elementary students attended disadvantaged schools. A large gap existed between the West Island sector (1%) and that of South-West Verdun (69%). And this trend was even more notable among high school students (0% vs. 77%), of which 28% overall attended a disadvantaged school. 4
  • In 2008, 18.8% of seniors in the region lived in low-income situations, similar to the Quebec average (18.7%), but well above the Canadian average (12.3%). 5
  • In 2008, if goods cost an average of $100 in all major Canadian cities, they cost $95 in Montreal. Fruit and vegetables ($106), as well as water and energy ($107) were more expensive, while at the opposite extreme, housing and rent ($82), or ownership ($86), as well as recreation, reading and training ($86) were more affordable. 6
  • In 2009, 70% of the population on the island didn’t eat the minimum required amount of fruit and vegetables. And the poor lacked 21% of the income required to adequately feed their families - after housing-related expenses were paid. 7
  • In January 2010, on the island, the cost of healthy nutrition was estimated at $6.90 per day per person for a typical family [40 year-old parents, 16-year-old son and 11-year-old daughter], or $837 per month. This represents an increase of $175 (+26.4%) in five years, since in January 2005, the same monthly grocery basket totalled $662. 8
  • Since its inception in 1980, the cost of a metro bus pass (CAM) represented 2.9% of a minimum wage earner’s monthly income. This proportion reached 5.1% in 2010 after declining for several years. 9
  • In 2009, public elementary and high school students were twice as likely to live in a low income sector on the island if they were born outside Canada like their parents (46%), or if they were born in Canada to immigrant parents (39%), or born here like their parents (22%), or one of their parents was born outside Canada (20%). 10
  • Based on a study conducted in Laval and Montreal of 1,206 students in eight high schools, several factors predispose youth to play video lottery terminals: boys (twice the risk), those who do not go directly home after school (3 times), and those who have friends who play on these terminals (6 times). It was also noted that these systems were significantly more accessible in lower income areas. Video lottery terminals are also the most lucrative game activity. Less than 10% of the adult population play these games. In 2007, video lotteries generated close to half of the net earnings of all national games. 11
  • Homelessness is frequently the fate of vulnerable and fragile persons with mental illness. Serious psychiatric illness affects almost 35% of itinerants, and an equal percentage have already attempted suicide, compared to 0.7% in the general population. 12
enfant au Club des petits déjeuners
© Marie-Reine Mattera
dotIn 1994, armed with the experience of foreign humanitarian aid, Daniel Germain founded the Club des petits déjeuners in a low-income elementary school in Longueuil. The goal was simple, and the results speak for themselves: attending class after eating well is essential to academic success. In the last year, Club volunteers served more than one million breakfasts to some 7,500 students from 96 schools in Greater Montreal, and 51 schools off the island. But the Club does so much more. All Club activities strive to promote respect, nourish self-esteem and stimulate cooperation among youth. And to close the circle, the Club is also a partner in the United Nations global food program, in order to provide help to improve the lot of children in the world. 13

http://www.clubdejeuners.org
Sources:

1 Special request based on tax data, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/I-1-a.pdf

2 Income trends in Canada, Cansim Table 202-0802, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/I-2-c-iii.pdf

3 Income trends in Canada, Cansim Table 202-0802, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/I-3-c-iii.pdf

4 Défavorisation scolaire 2008-2009, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2009
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/Portrait/montreal/ecoles/index.html

5 Income trends in Canada, Cansim Table 202-0802, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/I-4-c-iii.pdf

6 Inter-city indexes of consumer price levels, October 2008, Statistics Canada
http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/cst01/econ165b-eng.htm

7 Consultation sur le deuxième Plan d’action gouvernemental en matière de pauvreté et d’exclusion sociale. Mémoire présenté par l’Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal au ministère de l’Emploi et de la Solidarité sociale, 15 décembre 2009, 23 p.
http://www.cmis.mtl.rtss.qc.ca/pdf/publications/isbn978-2-89510-681-4.pdf

8 Coût du panier à provisions nutritif, Dispensaire diététique de Montréal, janvier 2010, 2 p.
http://www.ddm-mdd.org/pdf/10-01-Coût-PPN%20fr.pdf

  Pratiques et perceptions liées à l'alimentation. Ce que nous apprennent les personnes à faible revenu, par Lise Bertrand, Janine Desrosiers-Choquette, Marie-Paule Duquette et Caroline Marier, Vol 12, N° 2, Dispensaire diététique de Montréal et Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, décembre 2009
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/Publication/synthese/rapv12no2.pdf

9 Le transport urbain, une question de santé Rapport annuel 2006 sur la santé de la population montréalaise, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2006
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/Publication/rapportannuel/2006/report2006.html

  Site de la Société de Transport de Montréal (STM)
http://www.stm.info/tarification/tarif.htm
  Site de la Commission des normes du travail du Québec
http://www.cnt.gouv.qc.ca/salaire-paie-et-travail/salaire/index.html

10 Portrait socioculturel des élèves inscrits dans les écoles publiques de l’île de Montréal. Inscriptions au 30 septembre 2008, par Dominique Sévigny, Comité de gestion de la taxe scolaire de l’île de Montréal, 2009, 491 p.
http://www.cgtsim.qc.ca/pls/htmldb/f?p=105:3:0::NO:::

11 La loterie vidéo dans les quartiers de Montréal : une approche géomatique, par Nancy Ross, Jason Gilliland, Dana Wilson, Jeffrey Derevensky, Rina Gupta, Sherry Olson et Ian Haase, Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux, 2006, 61 p.
http://dependances.gouv.qc.ca/download.php?f=3e3dd3cca09c11761519edf58b995b6a
  S’occuper des jeux de hasard et d’argent, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/jeu/professionnels/index.html

12 Le phénomène de l’itinérance au Québec, Mémoire présenté à la Commission des Affaires sociales, Centre de santé et de Services sociaux Jeanne-Mance, Montréal, octobre 2008, 37 p.
http://www.csssjeannemance.ca/fileadmin/csss_jmance/Publications/Memoires/Pdf/MemoirePhenomeneItinerance.pdf

13 Site du Club des petits déjeuners du Québec et Manon Langevin
http://www.clubdejeuners.org/


Academic achievement is the most effective means of overcoming social inequality, and it also expands professional and personal perspectives. This is a philosophy that some immigrant youth seem to have grasped.
  • diplômeIn 2005-2006, 38% of handicapped students on the island attended standard classrooms in preschool and elementary school, a proportion that drops to 31% in high school. The situation is different throughout Quebec as a whole, where children tend to be more integrated (46%), which is less true for adolescents. 1
  • The proportion of students in the island who enter high school with a delay in their group fell 3.5 percentage points between 2002 (18.8%) and 2005 (15.3%). Even though in 2002, girls were already outperforming boys, three years later the improvement was even greater for girls (-3.7% points), decreasing from 16.2% to 12.5%, while for boys, it was -3.3% points, dropping from 21.3% to 18%. 2
  • In 2009, in Greater Montreal, a significant number of adolescents over 15 years of age did not complete high school (21%). Toronto (17.9%), Vancouver (15.6%), Calgary (14.5%), and above all, Ottawa (9.5%), had better results in this area. 3
  • In 2006-2007, the school dropout rate in Laval was 25.3%, placing it within the Quebec average, while Montreal (32.1%) was even worse than Longueuil (26.8%). Everywhere, boys are more affected by this phenomenon. However, since 2002-2003, boys made significant progress in Laval (-6.2%) and, to a lesser extent in Longueuil (-1.6%) and in Montreal (-1.3%). Over the same period, girls only made significant progress in Longueuil (-1.2%), while their situation remained stable in Laval (-0.1) and deteriorated somewhat in Montreal (+1.6%). 4
School Dropout Rates
2006-2007 Population Centres
source : Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport 4
  • In 2006-2007, high school dropouts in the public system affected more boys (38%) than girls (27%) on the island, and affected some areas (South-West-Verdun, 48%) more than others (West Island, 18%). 5
  • In 2006, in Greater Montreal, 29% of youth 15 to 24 years of age did not attend school. Twenty-five percent of these students spoke English as their mother tongue, while 25% were allophone and 31% francophone. 6
  • On the island, in 2009, 40.6% of public elementary and high school students spoke a mother tongue other than English or French, which now surpasses the proportion of those whose maternal language is French (38.1%). Similarly, the proportion of students who did not speak English or French at home (26.8%) was similar to those who spoke English (26.6%). 7
  • On the island, in 2009, the maternal languages of elementary and high school students, other than French and English, were primarily Arabic (7.6%), Spanish (6.8%), Italian (3.1%), Creole (2.9%), and Chinese (2.3%). 7
  • In 2008, in 31 elementary schools on the island, and in three high school pilot projects, 35 teachers assisted 2,186 students in learning one of 11 languages of origin.8
  • The graduation rate of high school students is 82% among Montreal students whose language spoken at home is Vietnamese, 78% who speak Chinese, 67% for Arabic [Maghreb and Libyan], 65% Persian [Iran], 52% Spanish [Latin American] and 40% for Creole students, in comparison to almost 62% for francophones. And in Toronto and Vancouver, certain immigrant groups were more successful than anglophone groups, but this advantage is generally less notable, except in the case of Chinese speaking students. 9
  • The proportion of students born in Canada to immigrant parents (23.4%) has reached a ceiling since 2005, while the proportion of students born outside Canada, like their parents (22.4%), grew rapidly since 2006. With students with one parent born outside Canada (10%), in 2009, 55.8% of public elementary and high school students on the island came from culturally diverse origins. 7
  • In 2009, in the region, 55.6% of the population 15 years of age and older had a diploma for post secondary studies, which is more than in Toronto (54.1%) and Vancouver (51.6%), but less than in Ottawa (62.9%) and Calgary (57.2%). 10
Educational Attainment of the Population 15 Years and Older
CMA, 2009
Source : Statistics Canada 11
  • With 26.5% of its population from 25 to 64 years of age holding a university degree in 2006, Montreal ranks 29th among 31 metropolitan regions in North America. The city is behind Calgary (20th with 30.6%), Vancouver (19th with 30.7%), Toronto (14th with 33.6%) and Ottawa (9th with 35.4%). Washington came first with 48% of university grads. 12
Population of 25 to 64 Year Olds Who Have a Degree or Postgraduate Degree
(Ranked among 31 metropolitan regions in North America, 2006)
Source : Statistics Canada et U.S. Census Bureau 12

École le Plateau
© Le Plateau Foundation

dotÉcole Le Plateau was founded in 1973 as the first music-oriented school within the Montreal Catholic School Commission (CECM). The philosophy behind this project is to introduce underprivileged children to a musical experience in a school setting in order to contribute to and enrich their basic development and independence.

www2.csdm.qc.ca/leplateau
Sources:

1 Portrait statistique de l’éducation, région administrative de Montréal, ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport, 2006
http://www.mels.gouv.qc.ca/stat/Portraits_regionaux/pdf/6_integration.pdf

2 Portrait statistique de l’éducation, région administrative de Montréal, ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport, 2005 et 2006
http://www.mels.gouv.qc.ca/stat/Portraits_regionaux/pdf/6_reussite.pdf

3 Working-age population study, Special Request (A050705), Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/IV-3-a.pdf

4 Taux de décrochage (sorties sans qualification ni diplôme) du secondaire, en formation générale des jeunes,
selon le sexe, par territoire de conférence régionale des élus (CRÉ) et ensemble du Québec,
Banque de données
des statistiques officielles sur le Québec

http://www.bdso.gouv.qc.ca/pls/ken/iwae.proc_acce?p_temp_bran=ISQ

5 En santé pour l’avenir ? Un portrait des jeunes Montréalais d’âge scolaire – 2e édition, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2010, 46 p.
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/Publication/pdfsurveillance/portraitjeunes_v2.pdf

6 Santéscope, Institut national de santé publique du Québec
http://www.inspq.qc.ca/Santescope/element.asp?Lg=en&NoEle=858

7 Portrait socioculturel des élèves inscrits dans les écoles publiques de l’île de Montréal. Inscriptions au 30 septembre 2008, par Dominique Sévigny, Comité de gestion de la taxe scolaire de l’île de Montréal, 2009, 491 p.
http://www.cgtsim.qc.ca/pls/htmldb/f?p=105:3:0::NO

8 Le Programme d’enseignement des langues d’origine à la Commission scolaire de Montréal. Réussites et défis, par Réginald Fleury, Les Entretiens Jacques-Cartier, 2008, 10 p.
http://www.chereum.umontreal.ca/activites.html

9 « Le cheminement scolaire des jeunes allophones à Montréal », par Marie Mc Andrew, Jacques Ledent, Jake Murdoch et Henda Ben Salah, Vie Pédagogique, 2009
http://www.mels.gouv.qc.ca/sections/viepedagogique/152/index.asp?page=dossierB_2

10 Working-age population study, Special Request (A050705), Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/IV-2-a.pdf

11 Working-age population study, Special Request (A050705), Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/IV-3-a.pdf

http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/IV-2-a-app.pdf

12 Le capital humain dans la région métropolitaine de Montréal, Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal, 2009, 28 p. http://www.cmm.qc.ca/fileadmin/user_upload/periodique/capital_humain_2009.pdf


Practicing prevention should be as pleasurable and natural as healthy eating, and participating in recreational activities. Should you be in need of a doctor, be prepared to travel far.
  • From secondary 3, approximately three young people out of four on the island have had a boyfriend or girlfriend (71%) and, for half of girls (51.9%) and of boys (51.1%), the relationships occurred over the course of the last year. A similar proportion of youth in secondary 5 have already had a boyfriend or girlfriend (76%); however, girls (63.7%) differ from boys (44.3%) in that they had relationships over the course of the last year. On the whole, more than one third of these adolescents had their love relationships undermined by one form of violence or another [psychological, physical, sexual], that they endured or had imposed on them. 1
  • Research among young Montreal couples revealed that more than half (56%) contracted the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) when having sexual relations with a new partner. All the more reason to focus on prevention. 2
  • In 2009 in Greater Montreal, 972 births were attributed to mothers 19 years of age or less, which represents 2.2% of the total. Ten years ago, the proportion was higher (3.8%). 3
  • In 2008-2009, premature newborns (weighing less than 2,500 grams) accounted for 5.5% of births in the region, and 5.9% on the island, a slight improvement from five years ago, while the situation deteriorated in Toronto (7%). 4
  • Montreal has increased hospitalization costs for pediatric asthma in five neighbourhoods, all disadvantaged on the socioeconomic scale. 5
  • On the island, from 2000 to 2005, excluding illnesses, tumours and deformities, the main causes of death among youth 5 to 17 years of age were car accidents (14.4%), suicide (6.4%), fires and burns (4%), as well as drowning (3.6%). 6
  • In 2008, there were 111 family doctors for 100,000 residents in Greater Montreal, more than in Toronto (90) and Vancouver (103). Yet, in 2009, 30.4% of the population 12 years of age and older didn’t have a family doctor, a rate that increased to 34.6% on the island, while the situation was clearly less worrisome in Toronto (8.2%) and Vancouver (14%). 7
  • On the island, between 2002 and 2007, less than one third of people 15 years of age and older ate a sufficient amount of fruit and vegetables, and this was more so for women (34%) than men (25%), regardless of maternal language. Education, income, as well as a positive outlook about health were advantageous; the same results applied to couples, but only for women. Over this period, food consumption by women remained stable, although that of men improved slightly. 8
Consumption of Healthy Food
For People 15 Years of Age and Older, Island, 2002-2007
Source : Direction de santé publique 8
  • Between 2002 and 2007, among people 15 years of age and older on the island, a few bleak trends were observed: a marked decrease in the consumption of milk and cheese, and no significant improvement in the consumption of fruit and vegetables, whole grain bread and legumes. 8
  • In 2009, 16.6% of adults in Greater Montreal were obese. Toronto (13.9%) and Vancouver (11.5%) had better results, even though these figures were no less disturbing. 9
  • In 2009, 21.6% of the population in Greater Montreal smoked at least occasionally, while Toronto (15%) and Vancouver (13.1%) achieved better results. However, the island (19.2%) is not as bad as Montérégie (23.8%) and Laval (25.8%) in terms of this major health issue. 10
  • In 1971, the average age that children on the island started watching television was 4 years of age. Then it dropped to 5 months. Today, more than 90% start before 2 years of age. What’s more, it is estimated that preschool children spend an average of two hours per day in front of the television. 11
  • In 2009, close to half (49.9%) of the people 12 years of age and older in Greater Montreal participated in recreational activities, more than in Toronto (45.3%), but less than in Vancouver (58.6%). 12
  • One quarter of Montrealers 65 years of age and older (26%) spend time at inactive leisure activities. Up to 74 years of age, this is a greater trend among men (25% vs. 19%), then after 75, the trend reverses itself, and women are more sedentary (37% vs. 19%). 13
  • The first significant progress for survival after 65 years of age began to appear in 1941 for women and 1971 for men, and the latter group recorded very few advances after 85 years of age. However, during the last twenty years, progress in men’s health has improved. On the island, in 2003, life expectancy for men [at birth] was 76.5 years, and 82 years for women. If we only consider those individuals who have already reached 65 years of age, men can expect to live another 16.7 years (13 of which in good health) and women 20.5 years (15.4 of which in good health). 14
  • Between 2005-2007, in Greater Montreal, life expectancy at birth reached 78.7 years of age for men and 83.2 years of age for women. 15
  • Between 2001 and 2007, 1,389 people took their own life on the island, approximately 230 per year. From 2004-2007, the rate remained stable at 12.2 suicides per 100,000 residents. Men committed three-quarters (74%) of all suicides, which were more prevalent among 24 to 44 year olds, whereas women committed suicide more frequently between the ages of 45-64. 16
  • According to the OECD’s (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) suicide statistics for 2005, Quebec ranked between Belgium (4th place) and Finland (5th place), and Montreal was classed between the Czech Republic (10th) and New Zealand (11th), while Canada experienced a more enviable position: 19th out of 29 countries in the study. 16
Camp des P’tits Cuistots
© Maison d’entraide Saint-Paul / Émard
dotCamp des P’tits Cuistots - a Maison d’Entraide Saint-Paul / Émard project

This program teaches young people from 6 to 12 years of age about the fundamentals of healthy eating, and encourages them to apply their knowledge and to share it with their families. Daily educational activities include : a morning cooking activity with the chef, taste-testing prepared dishes at noon, and afternoon themed activities about diet and a healthy lifestyle.

http://maison-entraide.org
Sources:

1 Violence et fréquentations amoureuses au secondaire : coup d’œil à Montréal. Enquête sur le bien-être des jeunes Montréalais, Rapport thématique nº 3, par Hélène Riberdy et Marc Tourigny, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2009, 26 p.
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/Publication/pdfjeunesse/violence_frequentations.pdf

2 « Le VPH affecte 56 % des jeunes adultes dans une nouvelle relation », Journal Forum, 14 janvier 2010
http://www.nouvelles.umontreal.ca/recherche/sciences-de-la-sante/le-vph-affecte-56-des-jeunes-adultes-dans-une-nouvelle-relation.html

3 Naissances selon le groupe d'âge de la mère par région métropolitaine de recensement, Québec (6 avril 2010), Banque de données des statistiques officielles sur le Québec
http://www.bdso.gouv.qc.ca/pls/ken/iwae.proc_acce?p_temp_bran=ISQ

4 Problèmes de santé – Grossesse et accouchement et Donner naissance au Canada, Institut canadien d’information sur la santé
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/III-1.pdf

5 Riches de tous nos enfants. La pauvreté et ses répercussions sur la santé des jeunes de moins de 18 ans, troisième rapport national sur l’état de santé de la population du Québec, ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux du Québec, 2007, 162 p.
http://publications.msss.gouv.qc.ca/acrobat/f/documentation/2007/07-228-05.pdf

6 En santé pour l’avenir ? Un portrait des jeunes Montréalais d’âge scolaire – 2e édition, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2010, 46 p.
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/Publication/pdfsurveillance/portraitjeunes_v2.pdf

7 Rapports sur les indicateurs de santé, Institut canadien d’information sur la santé
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/III-2.pdf

  Enquête sur la santé dans les collectivités canadiennes, Tableaux Cansim 105-0502, Statistiques Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/III-10.pdf

8 La santé est-elle au menu des Montréalais? Portrait de la consommation alimentaire des Montréalais pour la période 2002-2007, par Nathalie Pouliot et Lise Bertrand, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2009, 23 p.
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/Publication/pdfnutrition/santeaumenu.pdf

9 Canadian community health study, Cansim Table (105-0501), Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/III-3.pdf

10 Canadian community health study, Cansim Table (105-0501), Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/III-5.pdf

11 Pour revaloriser le droit au jeu, par Marie Jacques, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2009
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/droitsenfant/pdf/droitaujeu.pdf

12 Canadian community health study, Cansim Table (105-0501), Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/III-6.pdf

13 Vieillir à Montréal. Un portrait des aînés, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2008, 23 p.
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/Publication/pdfsurveillance/vieilliramontreal_v2.pdf

14 Vie des générations et personnes âgées : aujourd'hui et demain, Volume 1 (faits saillants), par Hervé Gauthier, Sylvie Jean, Georges Langis, Yves Nobert et Madeleine Rochon, Institut de la Statistique du Québec, 2004
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/publications/conditions/vie_generation_an.htm
  Portrait de santé du Québec et de ses régions 2006 : les statistiques, deuxième rapport national sur l’état de santé de la population du Québec, Institut national de santé publique du Québec, 2006
http://www.inspq.qc.ca/pdf/publications/545-PortraitSante2006_Statistiques.pdf

15 Espérance de vie à la naissance selon le sexe, par région métropolitaine de recensement, Québec (2 mars 2010), Banque de données des statistiques officielles sur le Québec
http://www.bdso.gouv.qc.ca/pls/ken/iwae.proc_acce?p_temp_bran=ISQ

16 Santé mentale des Montréalais. Portrait des indicateurs du tableau de bord stratégique 2004-2005 à 2006-2007, par Michel Roberge, Marik Danvoye et al. Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2010, 69 p.
http://www.cmis.mtl.rtss.qc.ca/pdf/publications/isbn978-2-89510-749-1.pdf


Housing in Greater Montreal is less expensive than elsewhere, but property ownership is more difficult than it used to be, and there is always a shortage of low-rent housing. Housing conditions for seniors who live alone has become a very important issue.
  • pictogramme logementIn 2008, in Greater Montreal, the average cost of a home was equal to 3.79 years of a family’s average income, essentially the same as the previous year (3.80). This ratio, which rose by 64% in ten years, was 8% lower than the Canadian average (4.13) and 13% higher than the Quebec average (3.36). 1
  • In 2009, it is estimated that the purchase of a detached bungalow was likely to require 39% of the average income of a Montreal household. This was greater than in Edmonton (33%) and Calgary (37%), but less than in Ottawa (40%), Toronto (49%) and Vancouver (69%). This figure, which should not exceed 32% of gross annual income, had already reached 36% in Montreal in 2006. 2
Residential Mobility
Change in Place of Residence, 2001 and 2006, CMA
Source : Statistics Canada 3
  • In 2006, the vast majority of seniors on the island lived at home (92%); after 75 years of age, one in two seniors lived at home. And a more significant proportion of seniors lived alone (35.9%) than elsewhere in Quebec (29.5%). Furthermore, Montreal’s female seniors were twice as likely to live alone (45.8%) than their male counterparts (21.5%); and 59.4% of these seniors were over 75 years of age, which is also the case for 47.5% of men in a similar situation. 4
  • Seniors on the island receive home support mainly from the government (53%), but a significant percentage is privately funded (22%) or comes from a volunteer, close friend or family member (20%). 4
  • Undeniably, Montreal is the Canadian capital of living alone. In 2006, even though Greater Montreal had 1.5 million inhabitants less than Toronto, 69,000 more residents lived alone. 5
  • In 2008, one third (33%) of Greater Montreal households had a cat, a percentage that dropped to less than a quarter (24%) in the rest of Quebec. 6
  • In 2008, in Greater Montreal, the rental of a two-bedroom property was equivalent to 11.6% of a family’s average income. This was similar to the Quebec average (12%), but less than the Canadian average (13.1%). And this was the lowest rate recorded (including 2001) in fifteen years. 7
Average Monthly Rent for a 2-bedroom Property
CMA, 2009
Source : Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation 8
  • Between 2002 and 2010, in Greater Montreal, the cost of a rental property increased by 12% and that of a residential property by 25%, while the cost of water, fuel and electricity experienced a growth of 21%. 9
  • At the beginning of 2010, more than 22,250 households were waiting for low-income housing
    (HLM - Habitations à loyer modéré) on the island, and the average wait was four and a half years. 10
  • In 2010, in Greater Montreal, 30,404 people of the average age of 82 spent $1,454 monthly for a standard room in a senior’s residence and close to three-quarters of these seniors lived alone (72.9%). On the whole, 3.5% of these seniors required fulltime care, which boosted their rent to $3,065. 11
MU at the Habitations Jeanne-Mance
© MU at the Habitations Jeanne-Mance

dotA mosaic mural created by residents, part of a Habitations Jeanne-Mance revitalization project, dedicated to beautifying their living environment. The mission of the MU is to educate the population about mural art by creating beautiful works of art in the Montreal area. Since its inception in 2006, the MU has embellished the city with over 20 murals and hopes to create an outdoor art gallery throughout Montreal that will resonate and shine within the community.

www.mu-art.ca
Sources:

1 Canada’s housing observer, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation and Median economic family income, Cansim Table 202-0202, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/V-2-b.pdf

2 Housing trends and affordability, RBC economic research, March, 2010
http://www.rbc.com/newsroom/pdf/20100315-housing.pdf
  A profile of economic security in Canada: RBC housing affordability index, Canadian Council on Social Development
http://www.ccsd.ca/factsheets/economic_security/index.htm

3 Population 5 years and over by mobility status, by census metropolitan area (2006 Census), Statistics Canada
http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/cst01/demo57b-eng.htm

4 Vieillir à Montréal. Un portrait des aînés, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2008, 23 p.
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/Publication/pdfsurveillance/vieilliramontreal_v2.pdf

5 Les personnes seules et le logement: vers un nouveau mode de vie ? Actes des Entretiens sur l’habitat, Société d’habitation du Québec, mars 2008, 126 p.
http://www.habitation.gouv.qc.ca/publications/M19958.pdf
  Population vivant dans les ménages privés, selon la situation des particuliers dans le ménage, par région métropolitaine de recensement, Recensement de 2006, Montréal et Toronto, Statistique Canada
http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/cst01/famil123b-eng.htm
http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/cst01/famil123c-eng.htm

6 Sondage réalisé par Léger Marketing pour le compte de l’Association de médecine vétérinaire du Québec, en collaboration avec le CDMV inc. et Hill’s Pet nutrition, janvier 2008
http://www.veterinet.net/nouvelle.asp?categ=3.4&no=674

7 Rental market, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation and Median total income by economic family type, Cansim Table 202-0411, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/V-5-b.pdf

8 Perspective Grand Montréal #14, Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal, juin 2010, 8 p.
http://www.cmm.qc.ca/fileadmin/user_upload/periodique/14_Perspective.pdf

9 Indice des prix à la consommation (IPC): indice d'ensemble et logement, données mensuelles, région métropolitaine de recensement (RMR) de Québec et de Montréal (23 avril 2010), Banque de données des statistiques officielles sur le Québec
http://www.bdso.gouv.qc.ca/pls/ken/iwae.proc_acce?p_temp_bran=ISQ

10 L’habitation en bref 2010, Société d’habitation du Québec
http://www.habitation.gouv.qc.ca/publications/M20821.pdf

11 Rapport sur les résidences pour personnes âgées – Québec, Société canadienne d’hypothèques et de logement, 2010, 77 p.
https://www03.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/catalog/home.cfm?csid=1&lang=fr&fr=1285010275012


If we have a tendency to overestimate street gangs, it’s undoubtedly because of their extreme violence and because they pave the way for a life of crime. Even though Montreal is a relatively safe place, we must not let down our guard.
  • pictogramme balanceIn 2009, Greater Montreal occupied a midway position in respect to crime, between that of Toronto and Vancouver. And these statistics are decreasing. All of these crimes were lower than the Canadian average, with the exception of vehicle theft. And all were greater than the Quebec average, with the exception of criminal traffic violations.1

  • In 2008, the hate crime rate aimed at a specific group was 1 in 100,000 residents, while in metropolitan areas of a similar size, it was at least four times higher (4.2). 2
  • In Greater Montreal, the number of immigrants who were satisfied with their level of personal safety increased from 76% to 92% between 1993 and 2004, while Toronto experienced a smaller increase (from 87% to 93%) and the situation in Vancouver was more stable (from 86% to 90%) in this regard. 3

  • On the island, the number of domestic infractions has been declining since 2001 (with the exception of 2005), but increased to 5,614 in 2008. And 82.6% of the victims of these misdemeanours were women. 4

  • The majority (84.6%) of the 1,265 registered sexual offences on the island in 2008 were inflicted on women, divided almost equally among minors as adults. On the other hand, boys are five times more likely to be targeted (12.8%) than men (2.6%). 5

  • The Greater Montreal area has a lower rate of juvenile delinquency than all other Canadian metropolitan regions, with the exception of Quebec City. 6

  • From 2001 to 2007, adult crime decreased by 19% on the island, and juvenile crime by 16%. Violent offences by youth at school experienced a decrease of 10%, dropping from 541 to 488. 7

  • In 2001, nearly 14% of all those suspected of crimes identified by the Montreal police were young people from 12 to 17 years of age. Among the cases in question, 42% were violent crimes, 45% property infractions, and 11% involved drugs. 6

  • In 2001, on the island, adolescents were involved in 11% of drug related infractions. They involved possession (71%) and trafficking (13%) of cannabis. By comparison, possession of cannabis only represented 42% of drug related infractions by adults, while cocaine trafficking (15%) and possession (14%) were approximately four times more frequent among adults than youth. 6

  • In 2007, youth on the island were primarily involved in three types of offenses: assault (62%), threats and extortion (18.8%), and robberies (13.8%). 7

  • In 2007, adolescents were involved in 12% of violent crimes, a figure that represents 6.5% of the population on the island. The percentages were similar for sexual assault (13%) and assault (12%). In particular, nearly one in five robberies (18%) can be attributed to youth, a finding which highlights a particular problem among youth: bullying with extortion. 7

  • In 2007, firearms were used in 2% of violent acts committed by young people on the island, and sharp objects in 7% of cases. In the majority of situations (70%), physical force or verbal violence was used. 7

  • The act of repeatedly committing a crime is particular to juvenile delinquency. In 2007, among 12 to 17 year olds on the island, violent crimes were committed by groups, a figure that dropped to 22% among 18-25 year olds and to 8% among older youth. 7
  • On the island, in 2007, adolescents were frequently involved in street gang-related crimes (one in three cases), but these violent occurrences only represented a small number (one case in ten) of juvenile crimes. 7

  • On the whole, crime attributed to street gangs represented 1.6% of criminal acts committed in the Montreal area in 2009; 0.3% involved property crimes, 3% assault, and 4% crimes against a person. Even though these numbers have decreased in the last 3 years, the proportion of homicides (16%) and attempted murder (35%) related to street gangs should be vigilantly monitored. 8
  • Of the 2,819 crimes committed against a person in 2007 on the island involving a young victim, 283 (9%) were related to street gangs. 7

  • In 2007, 26% of victims of sexual assaults that were reported to the Montreal Police force were adolescents, which accounts for 3% of the population on the island, almost nine times their demographic weight; also, girls were the victims of 12.8% of sexual assaults (twice their weight). Boys from 12 to 17 years of age, who represented 3.3% of the population, were the victims of 12.6% of all robberies reported in 2007 (close to four times their weight). 7

  • In 2001, on the island, in cases where at least one presumed perpetrator was 12 to 17 years of age, the victims were in the same age group (44%), or were between 18 and 24 years of age (15%), and residents 65 years of age and older only accounted for 1% of victims. 6
  • Since 2003, the Montreal Police force listed an average of 4,500 runaways per year. 9

  • On the island, in 2006-2007, there were 2,168 cases (6% more than in 1996-1997) where the safety or development of a young person was comprised, and the Youth Protection Act needed to be invoked to protect them. And similar to ten years ago (1,602), 1,633 of these were new cases, with a slightly lower population of minors (-2.7%). However, during this period, the waiting time to evaluate a reported incident decreased from 19.6 to 8.6 days, an improvement of 56%. 10
  • In 2008-2009, on the island, one in four reports of youth who were in need of protection (77%) came from the health sector (28%), the police department (28%) and the school sector (21%); others stemmed from families (15%) or half as often, from someone in the community (8%). Of all of these reports, 3,679 were acted on, representing 45% of the total: two out of three involved cases of negligence (33%) and physical abuse (30%); poor psychological treatments affected less than half of young people (15%), while behaviour problems (11%) and sexual abuse (11%) affected a similar proportion of youth. Children 5 years of age or younger suffered more from negligence and from poor psychological treatments; behavioural problems were more frequent among adolescents [12 to 17 years of age], while physical and sexual abuse particularly affected the 6 to 11 year old age group. 11
  • In the poorest areas on the island, more young pedestrians (8 times more), young cyclists (4 times more) and young passengers (3 times more), were injured at intersections than in more affluent areas. 12
  • In 2006, the average number of Montreal drivers involved in an accident with injuries was 5.2 out of 1,000 license holders. For drivers 65 years of age and older, the average number was 2.8, and for drivers 75 years of age and older, 3.4. Seniors, who represented 13% of all licensed drivers on the island, were on average involved in 7% of accidents with injuries per year. However, they were also overrepresented in serious or fatal accidents. 13
  • From 2007 to 2009, in Greater Montreal, victims of serious accidents (3.6%) or fatal accidents (0.4%) accounted for 4% of some 8,500 annual traffic injuries. 14
  • In 2006, pedestrians 65 years of age and older comprised 15% of the population on the island, but represented 37% of pedestrians killed as a result of a collision. 13

dotThe majority of disputes within the city involving neighbours, business people, visitors or itinerants are easily resolved. But when they persist, and communication between parties isn’t possible, these disputes are often turned over to the police or the courts. Now, thanks to the work of several local business people, there is a viable and impartial alternative in which conflicts may be resolved: a team of urban mediators, located in the downtown core, have helped resolve the tensions of the homeless for the last three years; their focus is on harmonious social cohabitation in the public domain. It is a unique and innovative approach – voluntary, confidential and free – that will hopefully extend to other neighbourhoods in the future. 15

Sources:

1 Crime statistics (based on incidents), by detailed violations, Canadian centre for justice statistics, Incident-based uniform crime reporting survey, Cansim Tables 252-0013 and 252-0051, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/II-1.pdf
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/II-2.pdf
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/II-3.pdf
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/II-6.pdf

2 Hate crimes reported by police, by census metropolitan area, 2007 and 2008, Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-002-x/2010002/article/11233/tbl/tbl01-eng.htm

3 How satisfied are immigrants with their personal safety? By Colin Lindsay, Statistics Canada, 2008
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-630-x/2008001/article/10672-eng.htm

4 Statistiques 2008 sur la criminalité commise dans un contexte conjugal au Québec, ministère de la Sécurité publique, 2009, 57 p.
http://www.securitepublique.gouv.qc.ca/fileadmin/Documents/statistiques/violence_conjugale/2008/Violence_conjugale_2008.pdf

5 Statistiques 2008 sur les agressions sexuelles au Québec, ministère de la Sécurité publique, 2010, 55 p.
http://www.securitepublique.gouv.qc.ca/fileadmin/Documents/statistiques/agressions_sexuelles/2008/agressions_sexuelles_2008.pdf

6 Neighbourhood characteristics and the distribution of crime on the Island of Montreal: Additional analysis on youth crime, by Samuel Perreault, Josée Savoie and Frédéric Bédard, Statistics Canada, 2008, 27 p.
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/85-561-m/85-561-m2008011-eng.pdf

7 La violence chez les jeunes : un portrait chiffré de la délinquance et de la victimisation, par Maurizio D’Elia, Service de police de la Ville de Montréal, 2009, 14 p.
http://www.spvm.qc.ca/upload/documentations/violence_jeunes.pdf

8 Actualités. Gang de rue, Service de police de la Ville de Montréal, février 2010, 8 p.
http://www.spvm.qc.ca/upload/documentations/GDR_fev10_V2.pdf

9 Runaways, Service de police de la Ville de Montréal
http://www.spvm.qc.ca/en/jeunesse/parent-phenomene-des-fugues.asp

10 Indicateurs repères relatifs à l'application de la Loi sur la protection de la jeunesse, selon la région sociosanitaire du centre jeunesse, Québec, 1996-1997 et 2006-2007, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/publications/referenc/quebec_stat/con_sys/con_sys_10.htm

11 Bilan DPJ 2008-2009, Centre jeunesse de Montréal – Institut universitaire, Montréal, 2009, 16 p.
http://www.centrejeunessedemontreal.qc.ca/pdf/dpj/bilan_dpj_2009.pdf

12 Assurer la protection et la sécurité des enfants, ce droit s’applique-t-il aux routes montréalaises ? Par Patrick Morency, Direction de santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal, 2009
http://www.santepub-mtl.qc.ca/droitsenfant/pdf/securiteroutiere.pdf

13 Les moyens de transport et la mobilité des aînés montréalais: intervenir face au vieillissement de la population, Table de concertation des aînés de l’île de Montréal et Conférence régionale des élus de Montréal, 2009, 99 p.
http://www.credemontreal.qc.ca/Publications/Aines/Rapport_Transport_et_Mobilite_TCAIM.pdf

14 Bilans routiers 2007, 2008 et 2009, Société de l’assurance automobile du Québec
http://www.saaq.gouv.qc.ca/documents/documents_pdf/prevention/bilan_routier.php

15 Trajet (organisme de justice alternative), par Caroline Lemay
http://www.rojaq.qc.ca/blog/montreal/trajet-jeunesse-montreal/


The number of cars is increasing faster than the population, but there is a slight drop in vehicle usage, which can be attributed to a significant increase in the use of public transportation, as well as biking and walking.
  • Pictogramme voitureIn 2008, it was estimated that there was a fleet of 1,789,000 vehicles in Greater Montreal, an increase of 10.5% compared to 2003, while the population only increased by 5%. This growth in the number of vehicles was more significant in the suburbs (+17%) than on the island (+6%), with an increase that was much greater than the population (+10% vs. +2%). Also of note was the fact that the number of men who owned vehicles remained constant, while there was an increase among women and seniors. 1
  • Between 2001 and 2006, the number of driver’s license holders on the island increased by 2%, but rose by 11% for those 65 years of age and older, and 29% for those 75 years of age and older. There were significantly more drivers [especially women] among those who will soon be turning 65 years of age. 2
  • In 2006, among island residents 75 years of age or older, 61% of men and 21% of women had a driver’s license. 2
  • Every morning in 2008, residents of Greater Montreal moved from one place to another 2,213,000 times, mainly for work (51%) and school (29%). On the whole, 89% of this movement took place in motorized vehicles and 22% on public transit. 1
  • Between 2003 and 2008, in Greater Montreal, there was an increase in the use of public transit (+15%), bicycles (+10%), and walking. Conversely, a slight decrease in vehicle usage was noted (-1%), which
    was observed for the first time since 1970, as well as in the number of passengers per vehicle
    (now 1.23/vehicle)
    .1
  • Between 2003 and 2008, morning use of vehicles decreased everywhere, except in the suburbs (+6%). On the other hand, off-island areas experienced the greatest increase in the use of public transit, notably in the north (+40%) and south shore communities (+52%), and also in Laval (+31%), which has only been accessible by metro since April 28, 2007. 1
  • In Greater Montreal, it is estimated that use of a car to transport children to elementary school increased from 22% to 31% in only five years [1998-2003], while walking decreased from 41% to 34%. Over the same time period, a decrease was also noted in the distance travelled between home and school, from 550 to 480 metres. 3
Modes of Road Transport to Elementary School
CMA Sectors, 2007
Source : Groupe de recherche Ville et mobilité 3
  • The city of Montreal had 502 km of cycling trails in 2009, the equivalent of 0.29 km per 100,000 citizens, making it better served than Toronto (0.17 km), but less than Vancouver and Ottawa (0.66 and 0.67), Calgary (0.99), and especially Edmonton (1.17). Montreal is hoping to double its cycling network in the next seven years. 4
  • At the 25th edition of the Tour de l’Île de Montréal, in 2009, more than 80% of participants in this major cycling event wore a bicycle helmet. It remains to be seen what the rate will be among Bixi users. 5
  Bixi
© Bixi
pictogramme bicyclettedotHow can you not salute the popularity of Bixi, this self-serve bike system that claims a place in public transit as an alternative to the car? After only three months of operation on the island, 278 stations serviced 8,419 members, and 77,070 occasional users who travelled 3,612,799 km, or the equivalent of 87 times around the planet, while saving 909,053 kg in greenhouse gas emissions. And the idea is catching on in Melbourne, Minneapolis, Washington, Boston, London…6

http://montreal.bixi.com/home
Sources:

1 Enquête Origine-Destination 2008. Constat sur la mobilité des personnes dans la grande région de Montréal, réalisation conjointe avec l’Agence métropolitaine de transport
http://www.enquete-od.qc.ca/

2 Les moyens de transport et la mobilité des aînés montréalais : intervenir face au vieillissement de la population, Table de concertation des aînés de l’île de Montréal et Conférence régionale des élus de Montréal, 2009, 99 p.
http://www.credemontreal.qc.ca/Publications/Aines/Rapport_Transport_et_Mobilite_TCAIM.pdf

3 « Proximité et transport actif. Le cas des déplacements entre l'école et la maison à Montréal et à Trois-Rivières », par Juan Torres et Paul Lewis, Environnement urbain / Urban Environment, Nº 4, 2010, 15 p.
http://www.vrm.ca/EUUE/vol4_2010/EUE4_Torres_Lewis.pdf

4 Canada’s Coolest Cities, by Alison Bailie and Claire Beckstead, The Pembina Institute, 2010
http://www.pembina.org/pub/2021

5 Sécurité des cyclistes: miser sur une approche progressiste, Mémoire de Vélo Québec concernant le Projet de loi nº 71 - Loi modifiant de nouveau le Code de la sécurité routière, Montréal, 25 janvier 2010, 17 p.
http://www.velo.qc.ca/files/file/memoires/VQ-ProjetLoi71_25janv2010.pdf

6 Bixi Montreal website
http://montreal.bixi.com/news/category/BIXI%20en%20chiffres


As worrisome as they are, greenhouse gas emissions from personal vehicles are lower in Quebec than elsewhere in Canada. But the rate of recycling organic matter is discouraging.
  • The Greater Montreal territory of 4,360 km2 encompasses 24% of wooded land and 12% of water. And half of all spawning occurs in the Montreal section of the Saint-Lawrence River (with the exception of the estuary). 1
  • Montreal is one of the Canadian cities with the least amount of green space per inhabitant. Between 1986 and 1994, half of the forests on the island were wiped out by development. Between 1994 and 2001, 750 additional hectares were lost to development. Historically, it is estimated that the disappearance of 90% of the island’s forests led to the loss of 60% of its biodiversity. Montreal has 48 vulnerable or endangered green species, Laval has 30, and in Greater Montreal, 63 plant species have disappeared, or are in the process of doing so. 1

  • In 2004, 3.2% of the land on the island was designated as a protected natural area, while the international norm is 6%. In 2010, Montreal was at 5.2%. 1
  • There are approximately one hundred ‘green’ roofs on the island, of which three-quarters were built in the last five years. The green trend is slowly catching on. 1
  • From 2001 to 2008, in Greater Montreal, the average July temperature was 26.9ºC (an increase of 1.6º compared with 1971-2000) and -14º in January (a decrease of 0.2º). Overall, the average annual temperature increased by 1˚ between the two periods. Among Canadian cities, only Toronto experienced a larger increase (1.4º). 2
  • Urban density is much less harmful to the environment than urban sprawl, which necessitates more movement and contributes to more greenhouse gas emissions. In 2006, with 58% of its population living within average density zones, Greater Montreal was second to Toronto (64%). Sixteen percent of the region’s population live in high density areas, the highest rate of any large Canadian city, including Toronto (11%). 3
  • In 2007, Greater Montreal emitted 1,219 kg of CO2 per capita, or 21.3% less greenhouse gas attributable to personal vehicles than in the average Canadian city. 4

  • Between 2001 and 2008, Greater Montreal experienced an annual average of 11.5 days of poor air quality. That’s more than in Ottawa (9.4), Calgary and Vancouver (1.1), but much less than in Toronto (20.2). 5
  • In 2006, daily water consumption in Greater Montreal homes rose to 417.5 litres per resident, 18 litres more than in 2001. 6
  • Garbage recovered on the island [recyclables and organics] increased 26% between 2004 and 2008, while the tonnage of garbage (household waste] decreased by 5%. Overall, the total amount of individual garbage produced increased by 7%.7

Individual Production of Garbage Collected Door-To-Door*
[Kg/person/year]
Source: City of Montreal 7, 8
* Excluding waste that citizens take to recycling facilities and special waste collection items.
N.B. Because of municipal amalgamations, 2004 data applies to the region, as well as to the city.

  • From 2002 to 2004, household waste from door-to-door collection to be destroyed rose by close to 20 kg per Montreal resident to 347 kg. Between 2004 and 2006, on the island, this amount stabilized at a lower level, and between 2006 and 2008, it experienced a marked decline. 7, 8
  • In 2008, every resident on the island produced 330 kg of household waste. 9

Types of Recyclable Matter Left by Residents for Curbside Pickup *
Island, 2008
Types of Recyclable Matter Left by Residents for Curbside Pickup
Sources: Recyc-Québec and Ville de Montréal 9
* Excluding waste that citizens take to recycling facilities and special waste collection items.
  • From 2004 to 2008, the amount of organic matter collected on the island increased (+12.2%), as did recyclable matter (+37.5%), dangerous household waste (+182%), and bulky residue or residential construction matter (+200.7%). 7
  • Overall, some 300,000 tonnes of garbage were collected on the island in 2008, approximately 30% of the total generated by residents. And 84% of the remaining waste was disposed of at off-island sites. Regarding organic matter, which comprises half of all household waste, only 8% is currently recovered, while the goal is to reach 60% by 2014. 9

  • In 2007, in Greater Montreal, only 11% of households composted table waste, while Ottawa (26%) and Vancouver (28%) composted more than one quarter of all waste, while Toronto was well ahead of other Canadian cities (63%). 10


Household Energy and Water Savings
CMA, 2007
Source: Statistics Canada 11

University of Montreal
dotThe idea sounds far-fetched. In several years, once the soil from the old train yard in Outremont is decontaminated, the University of Montreal plans to build a community tree nursery. When the University is ready to proceed with the project, hardwoods will be planted in surrounding neighbourhoods. This isn’t a new idea: it has already been implemented on a smaller scale by several schools and communities throughout Quebec. However, this will be a first for a project of this magnitude. 12

Les amis de la montagne
dotThe mountain and the river weave close and vital and relationships for a large portion of the population of the island. In the majority of cities in the world, water is distributed by water towers, reservoirs perched at the summit of a tower overlooking the community. These facilities are expensive and unsightly. In Montreal, Mount Royal, thanks to its central location and altitude, serves as a water tower. Drawn 610 metres from the river upstream of the Lachine Rapids, the water is first sent by four concrete pipes to two treatment plants. Once drinkable, some of the water is pumped into six reservoirs dug into the mountain and, by gravity, the water supply exerts the necessary pressure to maintain the flow through the entire distribution network. The area covered by each tank is identified on the surface by the colour of the hydrant heads. To distribute the water to taps, the network has more than 2,700 km of piping, which is equal to the distance between Montreal and Winnipeg. 13
Educ-o-vert
© Consortium Évolution
Consortium Évolution
dotConsortium Évolution is an organization dedicated to educating young people about environmental challenges. The aim of the organization’s Edu-co-vert program is to heighten awareness among young people about the effects of overconsumption and its impact on the environment. Third and fourth grade students are encouraged to donate an old toy to the Lutins Verts organization, which will restore the toys and sell them in their Biosphere workshop in December 2010.

http://consortium-evolution.org/accueil.html
Sources:

1 Les actes du Sommet sur la biodiversité et le verdissement de Montréal, Conseil régional de l’environnement de Montréal, 2010, 29 p.
http://www.cremtl.qc.ca/fichiers-cre/files/SBM2010/ACTES-SBM2010.pdf

2 Canadian climate normals or averages 1971-2000 and Canadian climate data online research, National climate data and information archive, Environment Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VIII-10.pdf

3 Canada’s Coolest Cities, by Alison Bailie and Claire Beckstead, The Pembina Institute, 2010
http://www.pembina.org/pub/2021

4 Canadian households’ greenhouse gas emissions from private vehicle operation, 1990 to 2007, by Berouk Terefe, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VIII-2.pdf

5 Air quality in Vital Sign communities, Special request, Environment Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VIII-3-a.pdf

6 Municipal water use, Environment Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VIII-1.pdf

7 Portrait 2004 des matières résiduelles de l’agglomération de Montréal, Ville de Montréal, 2009, 52 p.
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/pls/portal/docs/page/Environnement_Fr/media/documents/Portrait_2004_version_abregee.pdf

8 Portrait 2006 des matières résiduelles de l’agglomération de Montréal, Ville de Montréal, 2008, 52 p.
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/pls/portal/docs/page/environnement_fr/media/documents/portrait2006_derni%c8re_version.pdf

9 Réduire pour mieux grandir. Plan directeur de gestion des matières résiduelles de l’agglomération de Montréal (2010-2014), Ville de Montréal, 2009, 109 p.
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/ENVIRONNEMENT_FR/MEDIA/DOCUMENTS/PDGMR-2010-2014-FR.PDF

10 Households and the environment, Special Request, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VIII-5.pdf

11 Households and the environment, Special Request, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VIII-6.pdf
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VIII-7.pdf

http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VIII-8.pdf

12 « Un secteur vert et bien intégré aux quartiers environnants », Journal Forum, 25 mai 2010
http://www.nouvelles.umontreal.ca/campus/site-outremont/20100525-un-secteur-vert-et-bien-integre-aux-quartiers-environnants.html

13 Le mont Royal, château d’eau de Montréal, dépliant des Randonnées à la carte sur le mont Royal, Les Amis de la montagne, 2002 et Jean-Michel Villanove
http://www.lemontroyal.qc.ca/en/learn-about-mount-royal/homepage.sn


Culture is a major indicator of development, most certainly for individuals, but also for the economy of a city. Although they are at the very heart of creation, artists, writers and performers are often paid less than other cultural workers.
  • In 2008, cultural sector earnings totalled $12 billion. The direct contribution to the economy was $7.8 billion, or approximately 6% of the GDP of Greater Montreal. What’s more, the cultural sector generated 60,798 indirect jobs, a better result than the majority of service industries. 1
  • The cultural sector is rapidly growing in Greater Montreal, where 69% of its jobs are concentrated, compared to 49% for Quebec’s entire industrial sector. In 2008, there were 96,910 direct jobs, accounting for 5.1% of all Montreal jobs, compared to 3.9% in 1998. During this time period, the annual increase was nearly three times greater than that of the entire labour market (4.6% vs. 1.7%). 1

  • The number of Montreal artists increased by 33% between 1991 and 2006, greater than the increase in the working age population (+12%) during the same time period. Since 2001, the 9% growth rate in the number of artists was equivalent to the growth rate of manpower in Montreal. By comparison, between 1991 and 2006, the number of Vancouver artists grew by 76% and Toronto artists by 42%, while the working age population in these two cities increased by 28% and 8% respectively. This increase in the number of artists was greater in Toronto (5.25 times more than its working age population) than in Vancouver (2.71 times) and Montreal (2.75 times). 2
  • In regard to the concentration of artists in the region, according to the last census, Montreal (1.53%) is now behind Toronto (1.6%). Just like 15 years ago, Victoria (1.87%) and Vancouver (2.35%) remain in the lead. 2
  • In 2008, the average annual income of workers in the cultural sector was $44,000, which is 10% less than that in other industries ($48,547). But the sector is characterized by large disparities. With just over half (55%) of the sector’s average income, its 11,200 artists, writers and performers were the lowest paid ($24,400), a precarious situation since 75% of these workers were self-employed. On the other hand, architecture, publishing, radio and television broadcasting, and interactive gaming offered much more lucrative salaries ($60,000 to $65,000). 1
  • In 2006, the average income of Montreal’s 13,425 artists was 21% less than that of the local working age population, and similar to that of Laval’s 930 artists (-22%). This income disparity was much less significant for Longueuil’s 1,005 artists (-7%), but was much greater in Vancouver (-29%) and Toronto (-30%). 2
  • Overall, 300 arts organizations supported by the Montreal Arts Council in 2009 were financed by the public sector (45%) and by self-financing sources (34%). One-fifth (21%) of the income from private sources came as donations (14%) or sponsorships (7%). However, this increased relative to the budget, and 15% of the more affluent organizations shared 84% of private funding. This also varied according to the organization’s activities; thus literature (3%), dance (10%) and theatre (13%) received much less private funding than music (24%), movies, visual arts, media-related arts (25%), and festivals (38%). 1
  • The year it was created, the Montreal Arts Council supported theatre and musical performances equally. After 25 years of operation, the two disciplines are still predominant (29% and 33% respectively), but now the field is much more culturally diverse. 3
Disciplines Subsidized by the Montreal Arts Council
2007-2008
Source: Arts Council of Montreal 3

Proportion of the Population (15 Years of Age and Older)
Attendance at Cultural Events in the Last Twelve Months
CMA, 2005
Source: Statistics Canada 4
  • In 2008, film screenings accounted for 11.3% of performing art ticket sales on the island, a drop of 2 percentage points from 2004; 38% of these films were presented in French. The theatre occupation rate was 76.5% for over 8,000 screenings in 173 locations. 5
  • From 2004 to 2008, on the island, performances originating in Quebec dropped from 71.5% to 56.3%. 6

  • In Greater Montreal, French language radio station audiences grew over the years, but remained almost exclusively francophone. On the other hand, English language radio stations remained stable, but from 1987 to 2005, the number of listening hours that francophones devoted to English language stations increased from 32.3% to 38.2%. 7

  • In 2005, Greater Montreal francophones listened to English radio stations twelve times more frequently (38.2%) than anglophones listened to French stations (3.1%). 7

  • In 2007, less than one-third (29.8%) of the population of Greater Montreal were library members, compared to nearly twice as many residents of Vancouver (57.1%), and almost half of Toronto’s population (47.4%). Montreal library subscribers borrowed an average of 17.5 items per year, while Vancouver (21.6) and Toronto (24.4) experienced considerably more borrowing.. 8

  • If we take into consideration the population as a whole, and not only members, in 2008, Montreal’s network of 44 libraries processed an average of 5.61 loans per capita. In Toronto (10.88) and Vancouver (15.95), loans were almost two to three times more frequent. 9

  • In 2008, 71.1% of households in the region spent an average of $239 on reading material. In Toronto, 68.7% of households purchased $272 worth of reading material, and in Vancouver, 64.1% spent $197. 10

Mondial Choral
© Le Mondial Choral Loto-Québec

dotThe Loto-Quebec World Choral Festival was created by visionary Gregory Charles in Laval in 2005. Currently in its sixth year, this very dynamic form of art and leisure is enjoying increasing popularity in Quebec. Last year, 300,000 festivalgoers attended more than 250 performances given by ten thousand choral singers from all over the world. Today, considered to be the largest gathering of choirs and vocal ensembles in North America, this event showcases the great city of Montreal, bringing together the largest number of choristers in Quebec. 11

http://www.mondialchoral.org/en/
Sources:

1 Culture in Montreal : Economic impacts and private funding, Board of trade of metropolitan Montreal, 2009, 29 p.
http://www.ccmm.qc.ca/documents/publications/etudes/
CCMM_Culture_en.pdf?utm_campaign=pdf&utm_medium=web&utm_source=corporatif&utm_content=ch_presse&utm_term=culture

2 Artists in large Canadian cities, Statistical insights on the arts, Vol. 4, Nº 1, Hill Strategies Research Inc., Septembre, 2009
http://www.hillstrategies.com/docs/Artists_large_cities2006.pdf

3 Faire le point pour aller plus loin! Les 25 ans du Conseil des arts de Montréal en tournée, 2008, 21 p.
http://www.artsmontreal.org/fichiers/documents/Fairelepoint.pdf

4 General social survey: Timetable (cycle 19), Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VII-3.pdf

5 Statistiques principales des projections cinématographiques, régions administratives et ensemble du Québec, 2004-2008, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/regions/profils/comp_interreg/tableaux/projections.htm
  Statistiques principales des représentations payantes en arts de la scène, régions administratives et ensemble du Québec, 2004-2008, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/regions/profils/comp_interreg/tableaux/arts.htm

6 Panorama des régions du Québec, Édition 2010, Institut de la Statistique du Québec, 150 p.
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/publications/regions/PDF/panorama2010.pdf

7 Production culturelle et langue au Québec, suivi de la situation linguistique, fascicule 6, Office québécois de la langue française, Montréal, 2008, 124 p.
http://www.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/etudes/fascicule_06.pdf

8 Canadian Public Library Statistics, City of Mississauga
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VII-1-i-app.pdf

9 Canadian Public Library Statistics, City of Mississauga
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VII-1.pdf

10 Dépenses moyennes des ménages, par région métropolitaine sélectionnée, Statistique Canada
http://www40.statcan.gc.ca/l01/cst01/famil10c-eng.htm

11 Loto-Quebec World Choral website
http://www.mondialchoral.org/en/


Language, neighbourhood, work, and marriage are just several aspects involved in integrating into a welcoming society. Encompassing every aspect of life is a daunting challenge to say the least, which is not likely to lessen in the years to come.
  • In the last twenty-five years (1981-2006), the population of Greater Montreal grew by 27% while the number of immigrants increased by 64%. 1
  • Greater Montreal had 12% of Canada’s immigrant population in 2006, occupying 3rd place among Canadian cities, behind Vancouver (13.4%) and Toronto (37.5%). But the island ranked 4th in respect to the proportion of immigrants within the population (20.6%), exceeded by Calgary (23.6%), Vancouver (39.6%) and Toronto (45.7%). 1
Proportion of Immigrants in the Population
CME, 2006

Percentage of the immigrant population
Proportion of immigrants in the CMA population
Source : Statistics Canada 1
  • More than three-quarters (77.6%) of immigrants admitted between 1998 and 2007 and still located in Quebec in January 2009 live in the metropolitan area. The island of Montreal welcomed two out of three new immigrants, making it the major centre of attraction (64.3%), followed by the Laval region (7.1%) and the urban area of Longueuil (6.2%). 2
  • Among 236,975 immigrant arrivals who settled in Montreal, Laval and Longueuil between 1998 and 2007, more than half (57.5%) were classed as economic immigrants, 24.4% were admitted under the family reunification category, and 16.9% were refugees. In comparison to three years ago, the number of economic immigrants has increased (+6%), while the number of immigrants from the same family (-4%) and refugees (-2%) declined. 3
Breakdown of Immigrants
Between the Island and the remaining CMA, 2006
Source: Statistics Canada 4
  • The island is home to half of the population of Greater Montreal, and to three-quarters of the immigrant population. In 2006, certain groups were less concentrated than others, such as immigrants from Greece (61%), France (65%), and Libya (67%). On the other hand, Philippine immigrants were concentrated mainly on the island (89%), especially those who arrived since 2001 (94%). Among recent immigrants, those who had a tendency to take up residence off the island came from Columbia (34%) and Romania (27%). 4,5
Breakdown of Recent Immigrants (2001-2006)
Between the Island and the remaining CMA, 2006
Source: Statistics Canada 5
  • Between 2001 and 2006, adults [24 to 44 years of age] of parents born in Canada were more likely to leave the central municipality (18%) than were immigrants, which was the opposite case in Toronto (11%). Among those who moved off the island of Montreal, the municipality of Laval was clearly more popular among immigrants (41%) than it was among residents whose parents were born in Canada (16%). 6
  • Laval’s immigrant population is fairly privileged, partly due to the fact that they were part of a migratory wave in the 1980s from southern Europe, and for them, the exodus to the suburbs represented a way to successfully integrate. But throughout Canada, the economic situation of recent immigrants was less favourable than that of their predecessors. We must wait and see if these new Montreal arrivals will take less easily to the suburbs, and in fact, there is a definite slowdown in the spread of urban immigration. 7
  • Immigrants are less isolated in Montreal than they are in Toronto and Vancouver; in 2001, an average of 31% of Montreal’s residential population were immigrants, compared to 50% in Toronto and 42.5% in Vancouver. In other words, on average, seven out of ten people in the immediate environment are not immigrants. On the residential front, immigrants are more exposed to members of the Montreal community, more so than in Toronto or Vancouver. The situation is the same for visible minorities, who are less isolated in Montreal, compared to Toronto and Vancouver. 8
  • In 2006, Greater Montreal housed 4.4% of mixed-race* couples, which puts the city in 8th place out of 33 metropolitan regions in Canada. Toronto (7.1%) and Vancouver (8.5%) share the lead. 9
    *If only one member of a couple belongs to a visible minority group, or if both spouses or partners belong
    to different visible minority groups.
  • In 2006, in Greater Montreal, approximately one immigrant in three spoke French at home, one in five spoke English, and one in two spoke a third language. 10
  • In 2006, the proportion of people whose mother tongue wasn’t English or French was 21.8% in Greater Montreal and 32.6% on the island. 10
  • In 2006, in Greater Montreal, approximately half of immigrants who spoke a third language worked in both languages, while a similar number worked entirely in French (16%) or entirely in English (17%). 11
  • In 2006, in comparison to people born in Canada, the unemployment rate for recent immigrants was 1.9 times greater in Canada, 3 times greater in Quebec, and 3.5 times greater in the region. Nowhere has the difference decreased in the last five years. 12
  • In 2017, it is estimated that 21.7% of the population of Greater Montreal will be born outside Canada, a significantly lower proportion that what is forecast for Toronto (49.1%) and for Vancouver (44.5%). 13
  • The population of visible minorities in Greater Montreal could more than double, from 604,000 in 2006 to a little more than 1.5 million in 2031, while the rest of the population experiences more modest growth of approximately 10%. Those of Arab origin should show the largest increase, practically tripling their strength. Already in 2006, Montreal was home to the largest Arab community in Canada. 14
Proportion of Visible Minorities
CMA, 2006 and 2031
Source : Statistics Canada 14
  • In twenty years, Greater Montreal will likely have as many Arabs (7.5%) as blacks (7.8%), the two best represented groups, which account for half of all visible minorities. In Toronto and Vancouver, it is the Chinese (12.4% and 23.2% respectively) and South Asians (23.8% and 13.7% respectively) that will comprise the majority, while they account for only 4% and 3.5% of the Montreal population. 14
Maison d’Haïti
© Maison d’Haïti

dotLa Maison d’Haïti is a non-profit organization created in 1972. Its areas of activity include: social integration, education, and welcoming low-income immigrant families who have difficulty assimilating into the community. The organization’s mission is to improve living conditions for Haitians living in Quebec, as well as for other immigrants who face similar situations.

Since the earthquake last January, in addition to its regular activities, La Maison d’Haïti has become a Help Centre for those in distress within the Haitian community. The Centre also implemented a series of post-crisis activities to help integrate families, such as art therapy workshops, to encourage mourning and to start the healing process.


www.mhaiti.org
Sources:

1 La population immigrante dans la région métropolitaine de Montréal, par Farah Fouron, Division des affaires économiques et institutionnelles, Ville de Montréal, 2010, 7 p.
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/pls/portal/docs/page/mtl_statistiques_fr/media/documents/01_rmr%20de%20montr%c9al.pdf

2 Immigrants admis de 1998 à 2007 et présents au Québec en janvier 2009 selon la région de résidence, par période d'immigration, Institut de la Statistique du Québec
http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/publications/referenc/quebec_stat/pop_imm/pop_imm_10.htm

3 Présence au Québec en 2009 des immigrants admis de 1998 à 2007, Ministère de l’Immigration et des Communautés culturelles du Québec, 2009, 32 p.
http://www.micc.gouv.qc.ca/publications/fr/recherches-statistiques/Presence-Quebec-2009-immigrants-admis1998-2007.pdf
  Présence au Québec en 2006 des immigrants admis de 1995 à 2004, Ministère de l’Immigration et des Communautés culturelles du Québec, 2006, 44 p.
http://www.micc.gouv.qc.ca/publications/fr/recherches-statistiques/Presence-Quebec-2006-immigrants-admis1995-2004.pdf

4 La répartition spatiale des immigrants dans la RMR de Montréal, par Farah Fouron, Division des affaires économiques et institutionnelles, Ville de Montréal, 2010, 14 p.
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/pls/portal/docs/page/mtl_statistiques_fr/media/
documents/05_la%20r%c9partition%20spatiale%20des%20immigrants.pdf

5 La répartition spatiale des immigrants récents dans la RMR de Montréal, par Farah Fouron, Division des affaires économiques et institutionnelles, Ville de Montréal, 2010, 14 p.
http://ville.montreal.qc.ca/pls/portal/docs/page/mtl_statistiques_fr/media/
documents/06_la%20r%c9partition%20spatiale%20des%20immigrants%20r%c9cents.pdf

6 Migration from central and surrounding municipalities in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver, by Martin Turcotte and Mireille Vézina, Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2010002/c-g/11159/map-carte002-eng.htm

7 La problématique de la main-d’œuvre immigrante dans la région de Laval : portrait et questions par Annick Germain, Jaël Mongeau et Yvon Martineau avec la collaboration de Dominique Agossou et Philippe Apparicio, document réalisé pour la Direction régionale de Laval d’Emploi-Québec, INRS Urbanisation, Culture et Société, Montréal, 2005, 64 p.
http://www.ucs.inrs.ca/pdf/mo_immigranteLaval2005.pdf

8 Retour sur les notions de ségrégation et de ghetto ethniques et examen des cas de Montréal, Toronto et Vancouver, par Philippe Apparicio et Anne-Marie Séguin, rapport de recherche réalisé pour la Commission de consultation sur les pratiques d’accommodement reliées aux différences culturelles, Institut national de la recherche scientifique – Urbanisation, Culture et Société, 2008, 56 p.
http://www.accommodements.qc.ca/documentation/rapports/rapport-5-apparicio-philippe.pdf

9 Percentage of couples in mixed unions by census metropolitan area, 2006, Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/11-008-x/2010001/t/11143/tbl006-eng.htm

10 Rapport sur l’évolution de la situation linguistique au Québec, 2002-2007, Office québécois de la langue française, Montréal, 2008, 191 p.
http://www.olf.gouv.qc.ca/etudes/rapport_complet.pdf

11 L’intégration linguistique des immigrants au Québec, par Michel Pagé avec la collaboration de Patricia Lamarre, Étude IRPP, Nº 3, 2010, 44 p.
http://www.ceetum.umontreal.ca/pdf/IRPP_Study_no3.pdf

12 Census data, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VI-2.pdf http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/VI-2-a-iii-app.pdf

13 L’intégration des immigrés sur le marché du travail à Montréal. Politiques et enjeux, par Marie-Thérèse Chicha et Éric Charest, Étude IRPP, Vol 14, Nº 2, 2008, 62 p.
http://www.irpp.org/fr/choices/archive/vol14no2.pdf

14 Ethnocultural diversity within census metropolitan areas (CMAs), Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-551-x/2010001/ana-eng.htm#a3


There are numerous ways to be an active member of society. You can share your knowledge, your vision or your beliefs. You can also volunteer your time, your money, or your blood. This is a large area, where nothing is taken for granted and where working together makes all the difference.
  • In 2009, 54.9% of the population of Greater Montreal experienced a strong sense of belonging to their social environment. The Canadian average is 65.4%, while for Quebec it is 56.4%. 1
  • In 2006, 82% of the population of Greater Montreal was Christian, a percentage that could drop to roughly 70% by 2031, still a higher proportion than exists now in Toronto (62%) and Vancouver (50%). The number of Montreal residents who follow a religion other than Christianity could increase from 9% to 16%, while those of no religious affiliation could grow from 9% to 13%. 2
  • In 2007, in Greater Montreal, 37% of the population 15 years of age and older participated in organized volunteer activities. In Vancouver (45%), Toronto (48%), Calgary (50%), and Ottawa (51%), this type of social participation is much more prevalent. 3
  • In 2008, 21.5% of taxpayers in Greater Montreal made an average donation of $160 to charitable organizations. That is less than half of that given by citizens in other large Canadian cities. 4
  • In Quebec, the annual blood donor ratio for 1,000 residents 18 to 79 years of age has risen to 58. Laval, Montreal and Longueuil had the lowest ratio (40). On the island, the ratio is only 36. Municipalities on the west island had the highest donation rate. Conversely, in ethno cultural municipalities and boroughs, ratios were much lower. 5
  • On the island, men who give blood outnumber women (52.8% vs. 47.2%), as is the case throughout Quebec (57.4% vs. 42.6%). 5
Participation in Federal Elections
CMA
Source: Elections Canada 6

  • In 2009, 18.8% of mayors and 31.3% of municipal councillors on the island were women. On the other hand, women are better represented as presidents of school boards (60%) and as school commissioners (41%). 7
  • In 2006, Montreal municipal counsel had the smallest representation of elected visible minorities (4%) than any major Canadian city, immediately followed by Ottawa (5%), and far behind Toronto (11%) and especially Vancouver (27%). 8
  • Between 1908 and 2004, in Greater Montreal, the weekday circulation of Montreal’s four daily newspapers decreased 7.8% among francophones and 18.8% among anglophones. This drop can be partly attributed to the increase in the number of free papers that flooded the market for 18 to 34 year olds and for those who spoke a third maternal language. 9
  • In 1995, in Greater Montreal, 53.8% of people who spoke a third maternal language read only English-language daily papers. Ten years later, in 2005, 51.8% read only French dailies, a reversal of the trend, which can be partly explained by the number of new complementary French dailies that hit the market. 9
Le Santropol roulant
© Santropol Roulant
dotSantropol Roulant is an innovative community organization founded and run by young people in Montreal. More than one hundred volunteers per week, most between the ages of 14 and 35, devote their time to all aspects of the life of this organization. Food is the means used to counter social isolation and promote intergenerational solidarity. For fifteen years, thanks to the energy of thousands of volunteers, Santropol Roulant has prepared and delivered more than 400,000 hot, nutritious meals to individuals living with a loss of autonomy, primarily seniors, by car, on foot, or most often by bicycle. That’s nearly one hundred meals per day, six days a week all year long. The organization is working to create a sustainable urban food system, by cultivating rooftop gardens, and by working to develop a family of volunteers. 10

http://www.mondialchoral.org/en/
Sources:

1 Canadian community health study, Cansim Table 105-0501, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/X-6.pdf

2 Ethnocultural diversity within census metropolitan areas (CMAs), Statistics Canada
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-551-x/2010001/ana-eng.htm#a3

3 Canadian study on giving, volunteering and participating, Special Request, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/X-2.pdf

4 Amount on line 340 on an income tax return, Cansim Table 111-0001, Statistics Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/X-1.pdf
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/X-4.pdf

5 La géographie du don de sang au Québec : une analyse exploratoire, par Philippe Apparicio, Johanne Charbonneau et Gaëtan Dussault, Rapport de recherche réalisé pour Héma-Québec, Institut national de la recherche scientifique – Urbanisation, Culture et Société, 2009, 49 p.
http://www.ucs.inrs.ca/pdf/GeographieDuDonDeSang.pdf

6 Official poll results, 2004, 2006 and 2008 general elections, Elections Canada
http://vitalsignscanada.ca/rpt2010/X-3.pdf

7 Présence des femmes dans les lieux décisionnels et consultatifs régionaux, Montréal (23 avril 2010), Banque de données des statistiques officielles sur le Québec
http://www.bdso.gouv.qc.ca/pls/ken/iwae.proc_acce?p_temp_bran=ISQ

8 La participation et la représentation politique des membres des communautés ethnoculturelles au sein des instances démocratiques municipales, par Jean-Pierre Collin et Laurence Bherer avec la collaboration de Sandra Breux, Évelyne Dubuc-Dumas, Ève Gauthier et Amélie Dubé, Groupe de recherche sur les innovations municipales (GRIM), Institut national de la recherche scientifique – Urbanisation Culture Société, Montréal, 2008, 52 p.
http://www.inrs-ucs.uquebec.ca/pdf/RepresentationEthnos.pdf

9 Production culturelle et langue au Québec, suivi de la situation linguistique, fascicule 6, Office québécois de la langue française, Montréal, 2008, 124 p.
http://www.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/etudes/fascicule_06.pdf

10 Santropol Roulant website
http://www.santropolroulant.org/2009/E-home.htm


To prepare this check-up report about Greater Montreal, we consulted numerous online information sources.




The Foundation of Greater Montreal
would like to thank the following partners:

Métro          Cascades
Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal
Agence métropolitaine de transport
Association de médecine vétérinaire du Québec
Association québécoise des retraité(e)s des secteurs public et parapublic
Bixi – Montréal
Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal
Canadian Council on Social Development
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
Canadian Institute for Health Information
Cascades
Centre de santé et de services sociaux Jeanne-Mance
Centre jeunesse de Montréal – Institut universitaire
Chambre de commerce du Montréal métropolitain
Club des petits déjeuners du Québec
Comité de gestion de la taxe scolaire de l’île de Montréal
Commission des normes du travail du Québec
Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal
Community Foundations of Canada
Conférence régionale des élus de Montréal
Conseil canadien de développement social
Conseil des arts de Montréal
Conseil régional de l’environnement de Montréal
Consortium Evolution
Direction de santé publique de Montréal
Dispensaire diététique de Montréal
Elections Canada
Environment Canada
Fondation Le Plateau
Hill Stratégies Research Inc.
Institut de la statistique du Québec
Institut de recherche en politiques publiques
Institut national de la recherche scientifique: urbanisation, culture et société
Institut national de santé publique du Québec
Journal Métro
KPMG
Les amis de la montagne
Les Entretiens Jacques-Cartier
Loto Quebec World Choral
Maison d'entraide Saint-Paul/ Émard
Maison d'Haïti
Mercer
Milken Institute
Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux
Ministère de la Sécurité publique
Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport
Ministère de l’Immigration et des Communautés culturelles
Ministère des Affaires municipales, des Régions et de l’Occupation du territoire
Mondial Choral Loto-Québec
Montreal City Mission
Montreal Diet Dispensary
MU
Régions et de l’Occupation du Territoire
Office québécois de la langue française
RBC Economic Research
Recyc-Québec
Santropol Roulant
Service de police de la Ville de Montréal
Société de l’assurance automobile du Québec
Société de transport de Montréal
Société d’habitation du Québec
Statistics Canada
Table de concertation des aînés de l’île
The Pembina Institute
Trajet – Montréal
Université de Montréal
Vélo Québec
Ville de Mississauga
Ville de Montréal

Organizing Committee
Marina Boulos-Winton,
Philippe Collas,
Marcel Côté,
Jacques R. Gagnon,
Chantal Vinette

Research and Editing
Isabelle Perrault

Guest Author
Monique Proulx

Editing
Jac Joanisse
Translation
Jude Wayland

Graphics
Germain Parent

Webmastre
Serge Cloutier

We would like to express
our gratitude to

Michelle Bérubé,
Manon Langevin,
Caroline Lemay,
and Jean-Michel Villanove
for their collaboration, as well as special thanks to
Lise Bertrand,
Simon Brault,
Lyse Brunet,
Aida Kamar,
Marie McAndrew,
Sidney Ribaux,
Francine Unterberg
and Patrick Woodsworth
for their valuable advice
and time.


Vital Signs was originally inspired by a 2001 Toronto Community Foundation project. This year, 16 Canadian community foundations will simultaneously publish local report cards. At the national level, this initiative is organized by the Community Foundations of Canada, who will publish a national edition of Vital Signs.

Community Foundations of Canada


For more information, or to order our brochure,
please contact one of our department.

Chantal Vinette
Director of Communications and Marketing
514 866-0808 ext. 103

info@fgmtl.org

www.fgmtl.org


Foundation of Greater Montreal

1, Place Ville-Marie, suite 1918
Montreal (Quebec) H3B 2C3

Phone :
514 866-0808
Fax :
514 866-4202